Lady C's InfoNapsterizer

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8.10.2004

Blogging and journalism

One of the most to-the-point notes on how blogging compares with journalism -- in this case TV journalism--comes from Atrios:

Metablogging

One question I find rather silly is the "is blogging journalism?" question. The fact is, most of what we've agreed to collectively call "journalism" isn't really "journalism" -- or, to the extent that it is, much of it isn't any different from blogging.

A big chunk of television journalism, particularly cable and local news, though less the nightly network newscasts, involves recycling wire stories or other stuff from print journalism, adding in additional analysis, facts, opinion, debate, and some funky graphics and catchy theme music. Hey, that's almost just like blogging, though my graphics usually aren't so funky and I have no catchy theme music.

Interesting that Atrios would focus on TV journalism as a comparison, which in fact is probably much more apt than regular newspapers or even magazines.

There's more of a filtering process -- newscasts have to squeeze a lot into 22 minutes, so what they choose to cover, and the video bits they edit and play, are as important as deciding what's on A1. So there's a different dynamic of filtering mechanisms. And of those items that are chosen out of the vast number of new stories a day hit the wires, only some will really have legs. Not just that they extend over time, but they're worthy of drilling down, exchanging, exploring, widening, linking to other goings-on current and past.

A TV news story, like blogs and unlike print, has multiple voices, although presented in the context of the story's producer (reporter or blogger). The other voices may be links chosen by the blogger and/or comments to the story itself.

There's a time dimension here that needs a bit more thought. Regular TV news doesn't provide the absolute immediacy of the wire services or the event live broadcast. What's the equivalent for the blogosphere of the network news cycle?

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